“... we can remember that some spaces are already occupied. They even take the shape of the bodies that occupy them. Bodies also take the shape of the spaces they occupy and of the work they do. And yet sometimes we reach what is not expected. A space, however occupied, is taken up by somebody else. When bodies take up spaces that they were not intended to inhabit, something other than the reproduction of the fact of the matter happens. The hope that reproduction fails is the hope for new impressions, for new lines to emerge, new objects, or even new bodies, which gather, in gathering around this [space]. The “new” would not involve the loss of the background. Indeed, for bodies to arrive in spaces where they are not already at home, where they are not “in place,” involves hard work; indeed, it involves painstaking labor for bodies to inhabit spaces that do not extend their shape. Having arrived, such bodies in turn might acquire new shapes. And spaces in turn acquire new bodies. So, yes, we should celebrate such arrivals. The “new” is what is possible when what is behind us, our background, does not simply ground us or keep us in place, but allows us to move and allows us to follow something other than the lines that we have already taken.”

 

Sara Ahmed, Queer Phenomenology


 

Here,

we have begun to arrive.

 

Here,

in this space,

our bodies become present in their absence.

 

Here,

with each breath,

we leave a residual trace of ourselves as we are made a new.

 

Here,

with each breath, a new becoming.

 

(We make ourselves in our continual remaking for to breathe is to enable our bodies to regenerate. Here, each breath offers us a continual remaking. Each breath makes us remake ourselves. Each breath remakes our continual becoming: a continual arrival.)

 

Here,

we are allowed to linger forever in this space among bodies. Here, even when our bodies are no longer afforded the ability to speak, our presence offers a silent reminder of our arrival. Commanding presence, our arrivals are heavy, weighted. They take up space and remain in the crevices of the places we inhabit. Here, in these vessels, our bodies linger forever as we are forever arriving.

 

It is finally at this point, here, where we recognize that we have not begun to arrive for we are continually arriving. We have always been arriving. We have always been present and we will continue to remain, arriving.